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Neurobiology

showing 1-5 of 39 breaks

Finding the one: what prairie voles can tell us about the drive to seek out our romantic partner

As humans, we fall in love and "couple-up", something scientists refer to as a pair bond. This is unusual among mammals, most of whom are promiscuous - typically mating and moving on. Fewer than 10% of mammalian species share our ability to form pair bonds,... click to read more

  • William M. Sheeran | MD/PhD Student at Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • David S.W. Protter | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • Zoe R. Donaldson | Assistant Professor at Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado, USA; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado, USA
Views 2101
Reading time 5 min
published on Jun 3, 2021
How to counteract age when the nervous system is damaged

As we get older, the body becomes more prone to damage and is less able to repair it. The delicate tissue of the brain and spinal cord (collectively referred to as the central nervous system) are no exception. With age, damage due to traumatic brain... click to read more

  • Nathan J. Michaels | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  • Jason R. Plemel | Assistant Professor at University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Views 837
Reading time 4.5 min
published on May 11, 2021
How our brain temporally organizes our memories of past events

The ability of the brain to represent time is fundamental for human experience. When something remarkable happens to us, our brain records it as a video. When we remember it, we recall also the location and time sequence in which the event occurred, in addition... click to read more

  • Elena Delfino | PhD Student at University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Views 824
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 7, 2021
Artificial vision in the spotlight

Out of sight - out of mind, as they say. Or maybe not? This can be an intriguing question for a neuroscientist today. For our eyes, everyday life is nothing more than light. The train ticket you bought, the person you chatted with, the article... click to read more

  • Polyxeni Damala | PhD Student at Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Views 1149
Reading time 3 min
published on Apr 29, 2021
Learning to stop: two types of neurons cooperate to adjust behaviour

We continuously learn about the consequences of our actions and change our behaviour accordingly so we can in future repeat a response that produced the desired outcome and hold back learned behaviours that are no longer appropriate. Imagine you are hungry and go to the... click to read more

  • Miriam Matamales | Research Fellow at School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Views 1414
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Mar 19, 2021