/
partner with:

agriculture

number of breaks: 8

showing 1-5 of 8 breaks

Why does biodiversity matter for agriculture?

Nature is a vital service provider for agriculture in many ways. Fruit trees and other pollinator-dependent crops are pollinated by wild insects like bumblebees, solitary bees, or flies. Other insects like predatory ladybugs or ground beetles eat pests that would otherwise damage or even destroy... click to read more

  • Matteo Dainese | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Institute for Alpine Environment, Eurac Research, Bozen/Bolzano, Italy
  • Emily A. Martin | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Animal Ecology and Tropical Biology, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
  • Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter | Professor at Department of Animal Ecology and Tropical Biology, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
Views 499
Reading time 3 min
published on Jun 10, 2020
Rainfall is changing: when and where we need to be ready to adapt?

Climate change will affect rainfall patterns around the world. Because rainfall is such a variable quantity, and models still have a hard time providing reliable projections, few studies have to date ventured to evaluate if these future patterns will move the climate outside the range... click to read more

  • Maisa Rojas Corradi | Professor at Departamento de Geofísica, Centro del Clima y la Resiliencia, Universidad de Chile, Santiago de Chile, Chile
Views 840
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 21, 2019
Reinventing a bacterial biopesticide: an old microbe with a fresh new look

In the 1980s it was discovered that some relatives of the bacterium Burkholderia cepacia (formerly Pseudomonas cepacia) were able to form close relationships with plant roots, and also make a range of antimicrobials capable of killing plant pathogens. Several US pesticide companies exploited this bacterium... click to read more

  • Alex J. Mullins | PhD student at Microbiomes, Microbes and Informatics Group, Organisms and Environment Division, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK
Views 1229
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Sep 24, 2019
Marine mammals may suffer dire consequences of ancient gene loss

Have you ever lost something? Perhaps you have misplaced your keys or left an umbrella on the bus. Generally speaking, losing things has negative consequences. Without your keys, you might be locked out of your house or car, and without your umbrella, you might get... click to read more

Views 2714
Reading time 4 min
published on Feb 8, 2019
The Poisoned Oasis: Neonicotinoid Spillover Harms Bees Near Corn

Neonicotinoids are a highly controversial class of insecticides that are often applied as seed coatings for crops such as corn, soy and, canola. Neonicotinoids are systemic and water soluble; once treated-seeds are planted, the insecticides are taken up by the growing plant through the roots... click to read more

  • Nadia Tsvetkov | PhD student at Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, Canada
  • Amro Zayed | Associate Professor at Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, Canada
Views 3406
Reading time 4 min
published on Jul 5, 2018