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Plant Biology

showing 1-5 of 11 breaks

The fragrance of plants: how their perfume pervades the air

One of the most seemingly boring aspects of plants is perhaps the most exciting. Plants are sessile organisms, which means that they do not move. In order to respond to environmental stresses and to interact with other organisms, plants instead rely on a chemical language. Volatiles,... click to read more

  • Joshua Widhalm | Assistant Professor at Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010, USA
  • Funmilayo Adebesin | PhD student at Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010, USA
  • Natalia Dudareva | Distinguished Professor at Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010, USA
Views 88
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Apr 18, 2018
Bringing the flavor back to modern tomatoes

While many people remember the wonderful flavor of a garden-grown heirloom tomato, this flavor is not found in modern commercial tomatoes. Modern tomato breeding has focused on disease resistance, yield, shelf-life and firmness for shipping. While these traits are essential for large scale year-round production... click to read more

  • Denise Tieman | Research assistant at University of Florida, Horticultural Sciences Dept., Gainesville FL 32611
Views 731
Reading time 3 min
published on Dec 1, 2017
How do plants breathe?

Whether or not you like your sprouts, plants will likely form a major component of your diet: cereals, bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, chips, etc. all come from plants. Rice, maize and wheat alone make up 60% of the world's food intake. Not only are plants... click to read more

  • Richard Morris | Professor at John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UH, UK
  • Hugh Woolfenden | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UH, UK
Views 802
Reading time 4 min
published on Nov 22, 2017
Boechera, Why are you so Cool?

Kipling once said: "Only mad-dogs and Englishmen go out in the noon day sun". To this list we can also add plants they are out in the noon day sun because they are not able to move to the shade when things get hot. Plants... click to read more

  • Elizabeth Waters | Professor at San Diego State University, Campanile Drive San Diego, CA, USA
Views 522
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Nov 21, 2017
One root for every soil: a double-personality tale

In biology, life success is based on the ability to have offspring. For that, before reproduction, organisms must deal with different and sometimes unfriendly situations. The capacity to overcome environmental challenges increases the possibility to have descendants, and will determine then that organism's life success. A... click to read more

  • Laura Lorenzo | PhD student at Department of Plant Biology, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 479
Reading time 3 min
published on Sep 12, 2017