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Earth & Space

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When One Disaster Follows Another

In September 2017 Hurricane Irma passed close to Puerto Rico, and its torrential rainfall and high winds led to widespread power outages, saturated ground, blocked roads, and damaged water systems. Just two weeks later, Hurricane Maria moved directly across the island with sustained winds of... click to read more

  • Gary Machlis | Professor at Clemson University, USA
  • Steward Pickett | Distinguished Senior Scientist at Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, USA
Views 524
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Sep 14, 2022
The Discovery Of An Unusual Repeating Radio Transient

Radio astronomy is experiencing a renaissance due to global work toward the Square Kilometer Array, which will be the world’s largest radio telescope. Our team works on a radio telescope that explores new technologies for the SKA: the Murchison Widefield Array. It observes at low... click to read more

  • Natasha Hurley-Walker | Senior Lecturer, ARC Future Fellow at Curtin University, International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Perth, Australia
Views 685
Reading time 3 min
published on Aug 22, 2022
The world’s clearest view of stars is seen from the highest point of the Antarctic ice sheet

Twinkle, twinkle, little star. Why do the stars twinkle? It is because of the turbulence in the atmosphere. You may hear turbulence from the airplane broadcast when the airplane is shaking. The turbulence shakes not only airplanes, but also the light from the stars, by altering... click to read more

  • Bin Ma | Associate Professor at School of Physics and Astronomy, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai, China
Views 814
Reading time 4 min
published on Jul 21, 2022
Rocks beneath volcanic hotspots can be surprisingly cool

Volcanoes shape the surface of the Earth, by bringing molten rock from the deep interior to the surface and creating the crust. The majority of the Earth’s volcanism happens at plate boundaries, so called inter-plate volcanism, including the mid-ocean ridges (like the East Pacific Rise... click to read more

  • Xiyuan Bao | PhD student at Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
Views 732
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jul 15, 2022
Are super-Earths more friendly to life than we thought?

The inner core of the Earth is a solid spinning ball of mostly iron, almost the size of the Moon. Temperatures on the surface of the inner core can reach close to those at the surface of the Sun. The next layer, the outer core,... click to read more

  • Arshia Ruina | PhD Student at University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Views 1161
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 30, 2022