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number of breaks: 7

showing 1-5 of 7 breaks

How a mint turned into catmint

The plant catmint, also known as catnip, is named after its notorious effect on cats. When cats sniff or rub against catmint, it drives them to act strangely: rolling over, pawing and rubbing. Its scientific name is also feline-inspired: Nepeta cataria. The cause of the cats'... click to read more

  • Benjamin R. Lichman | Lecturer at Centre for Novel Agricultural Products, Department of Biology, University of York, York, UK
Views 760
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Feb 17, 2021
Reinventing a bacterial biopesticide: an old microbe with a fresh new look

In the 1980s it was discovered that some relatives of the bacterium Burkholderia cepacia (formerly Pseudomonas cepacia) were able to form close relationships with plant roots, and also make a range of antimicrobials capable of killing plant pathogens. Several US pesticide companies exploited this bacterium... click to read more

  • Alex J. Mullins | PhD student at Microbiomes, Microbes and Informatics Group, Organisms and Environment Division, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK
Views 1707
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Sep 24, 2019
Ancient Egyptian mummies give up the last of their secrets

Our group together with an international team of scientists successfully recovered and analyzed ancient DNA from Egyptian mummies dating from approximately 1400 BC to 400 AD, establishing ancient Egyptian mummies as a reliable source for genetic material to study the ancient past. The study, published... click to read more

  • Johannes Krause | Professor at Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Kahlaische Straße 10 07745, Jena, Germany
Views 4736
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 15, 2018
Lego blocks for precise gene editing

DNA is the core-element of life as we know it. It can be imagined as a long helical double strand composed of sequences of information written with four chemical "letters" called nucleotides. Determinate sequences of letters delineate stretches of DNA called genes, which in turn... click to read more

  • Jared Carlson-Stevermer | PhD student at Department of Biomedical Engineering, Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI, USA
Views 4047
Reading time 4 min
published on Feb 6, 2018
Bringing the flavor back to modern tomatoes

While many people remember the wonderful flavor of a garden-grown heirloom tomato, this flavor is not found in modern commercial tomatoes. Modern tomato breeding has focused on disease resistance, yield, shelf-life and firmness for shipping. While these traits are essential for large scale year-round production... click to read more

  • Denise Tieman | Professor at University of Florida, Horticultural Sciences Dept., Gainesville FL 32611
Views 3913
Reading time 3 min
published on Dec 1, 2017