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Anatoly Kozlov

joined in Jan 16, 2018

Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Genetics & Evolution, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland.

Kozlov has 4 breaks published.

Following the traces of fermentation

Yeasts are everywhere. This little bubbly-like single-cell fungus is a superstar of human food culture. Bread, beer, yogurt, cheese, wine and even coffee and cacao require yeast for their preparation. Thanks to Louis Pasteur we know that yeasts are responsible for the process of fermentation... click to read more

  • Anatoly Kozlov | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Genetics & Evolution, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 3283
Reading time 4 min
published on Jan 16, 2018
Exploring the development of the neocortex

For all our life we've always wondered: what makes us human? A possible answer to that today would be: the neocortex. This evolutionary youngest part of our brain is a nest for such precious mental features as: emotions, reasoning, attention, communication etc. It's true that... click to read more

  • Anatoly Kozlov | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Genetics & Evolution, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 2384
Reading time 4 min
published on Sep 4, 2018
On where altruistic behaviour can be found in our brain

We, human beings, are made in a way as to understand each other through external features, such as voice tone, facial expression and body language. All this information together with the natural context allows us to quickly and intuitively interpret the behaviour of others, their... click to read more

  • Anatoly Kozlov | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Genetics & Evolution, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 2028
Reading time 4 min
published on Feb 4, 2020
Coronaviruses: Contagious Beasts and Where to Find Them

First and foremost: viruses do not appear out of nowhere. They exist in nature moving from one hosting animal to another. Still, we don't realize their presence until they cross our way. For example, the first time a coronavirus was discovered was back in the... click to read more

  • Anatoly Kozlov | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Genetics & Evolution, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 2553
Reading time 4 min
published on Apr 3, 2020