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Content: Volume 7, Issue 2

showing 51-55 of 56 breaks

Microbial life on our tongue

Stick out your tongue! That's one of the first things you hear when you visit a doctor. The tongue has been used as an indicator of health or disease for thousands of years: from ancient Egypt and Chinese traditional medicine to today's modern medical practice... click to read more

  • Gary G. Borisy | Senior Investigator at The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, USA
  • Jessica L. Mark Welch | Associate Scientist at The Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA
Views 5826
Reading time 4 min
published on Apr 12, 2021
Plastic is fantastic, but recycling is no magic

Plastic has been unbeaten for decades as the top packaging material. Plastic materials are lightweight, flexible and durable, and can easily undergo a plethora of recycling processes without being irreversibly damaged. Why then, do substantial amounts of unused plastic material end up going to waste? Plastic... click to read more

  • Olivier A. Kirchhoffer | PhD Student at School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Views 2488
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Apr 9, 2021
Are you going places? Mapping unequal access to services and opportunities worldwide

City dwellers often dream of living in a pastoral rural area to get away from it all. However, once there, they realize rurality requires travel time to access even basic services they previously took for granted. The challenge of accessing services, such as healthcare and... click to read more

  • Andrea Cattaneo | Senior Economist at Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy
Views 1930
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Apr 8, 2021
Leveraging Earth to study how water formed on ancient Mars

Unlike our own Blue Planet, Mars is currently too cold to sustain liquid water at its surface. At first glance, Mars 4 billion years ago should have been even colder. Back then, the Sun's brightness was only about 70% of what it is today. Yet... click to read more

Views 2813
Reading time 4 min
published on Apr 7, 2021
The plant with the spider-like poison – Australia’s giant stinging tree

Deep in the rainforests of eastern Australia, all along New South Wales up to south-eastern Queensland, one can find Dendrocnide excelsa, the giant stinging tree. Key to its name, the stinging tree possesses thin, felt-like hairs on its leaves that, in reality, act as densely... click to read more

  • Ralph Bulanadi | PhD Student at Department of Quantum Matter Physics, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Views 4349
Reading time 4 min
published on Apr 6, 2021