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Content: Volume 7, Issue 2

showing 16-20 of 56 breaks

Finding the one: what prairie voles can tell us about the drive to seek out our romantic partner

As humans, we fall in love and "couple-up", something scientists refer to as a pair bond. This is unusual among mammals, most of whom are promiscuous - typically mating and moving on. Fewer than 10% of mammalian species share our ability to form pair bonds,... click to read more

  • William M. Sheeran | MD/PhD Student at Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • David S.W. Protter | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • Zoe R. Donaldson | Assistant Professor at Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado, USA; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado, USA
Views 4907
Reading time 5 min
published on Jun 3, 2021
New treatment options for Zika virus infection

The recent outbreak of the Zika virus in South America in 2015-2016 had devasting consequences, involving at least 200,000 human infections. The Zika virus mostly spreads among people through bites from infected mosquitoes, but can also spread through sexual transmission. The number of infections are... click to read more

  • Rachel P. M. Abrams | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
  • Avindra Nath | Senior Investigator at National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
Views 1859
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jun 2, 2021
The clock as a frenemy: the importance of the biological rhythms in cancer prognosis

Have you ever wondered why we wake up in the morning? Or why we get hungry at noon? Most physiological processes oscillate with a period close to 24 hours, called circadian rhythms. These rhythms are controlled by a central clock in our brain, which acts... click to read more

  • Ignacio Aiello | Assistant Professor at Laboratorio de Cronobiología, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Natalia Paladino | Assistant Professor at Laboratorio de Cronobiología, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Views 1828
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jun 1, 2021
Networking between marine protected areas help sustain fisheries

Fisheries have an important impact on ocean health, but what if we could protect our oceans and eat it too. Setting aside ocean areas for marine conservation helps preserve marine habitats and biodiversity, but can also help sustain fisheries. No-take zones that prohibit fishing activities are... click to read more

  • Hugo B. Harrison | Senior Research Fellow at ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University; Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville, Queensland, 4810, Australia.
Views 1929
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 31, 2021
Ice production on the hottest planet in our solar system

Water is crucial to life on Earth. It is also present on other planets and solar system bodies. Indeed, ground-based radar observations and space probe data indicated the presence of frozen water ice even on Mercury, the hottest planet in our solar system! Water, in... click to read more

  • Brant M. Jones | Professor at Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
  • Menelaos Sarantos | Professor at Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, USA
  • Thomas M. Orlando | Professor at Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Views 2279
Reading time 4 min
published on May 28, 2021