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Evolution & Behaviour

showing 6-10 of 104 breaks

Scrambled frog eggs return to life

When you make scrambled eggs for breakfast, you are probably not expecting any signs of life in the resulting mush, let alone development into chicken embryos. Indeed, it seems common sense that living things are organized structures, and once these structures are jumbled up, life... click to read more

  • Xianrui Cheng | Research Scientist at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
  • James E. Ferrell, Jr. | Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
Views 1010
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Aug 31, 2020
Processions in Palaeozoic seas

What do ants, processionary caterpillars, birds, apes and football supporters have in common? They all exemplify the huge variety of present-day collective and social behaviours. One of the questions puzzling scientists is whether collective behaviour appeared very early in the evolution of animals or more... click to read more

  • Jean Vannier | CNRS-Researcher at Laboratoire de géologie de Lyon: Terre, Planètes, Environnement, Université de Lyon, CNRS, France
  • Muriel Vidal | Lecturer at Université de Bretagne Occidentale, CNRS, France
  • Robin Marchant | Curator at Université de Lausanne, Musée Cantonal de Géologie, Lausanne, Switzerland
Views 985
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Aug 20, 2020
T. rex growing pains: the king of dinosaurs was first a tyrannical teenager

Without a doubt, Tyrannosaurus rex is the most famous dinosaur in the world. Its adult body length of 40 feet, 5-foot-long head, and bone-crushing teeth are the stuff of legend, but we know surprisingly little about its childhood. What did it look like then? How... click to read more

  • Holly N. Woodward | Associate Professor at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
Views 912
Reading time 4 min
published on Aug 13, 2020
How Does Memory Guide Learning? Birds Can Answer

Memory is how our past experiences shape our behavior in the future. For example, as children, we form memories of our parents and other people speaking and use those memories to learn spoken language ourselves. Forming memories cause changes to many different regions of our... click to read more

  • Wenchan Zhao | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA
  • Todd F. Roberts | Assistant Professor at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA
Views 945
Reading time 3 min
published on Aug 7, 2020
The Rat's Euler Whiskers

In 1970, Thomas Woolsey, a young neuroscientist, was peering through a microscope at thin slices of mouse brain, when he observed something quite remarkable. In a region of the brain called the cerebral cortex, which plays a key role in sensing, memory and emotion in... click to read more

  • V.G.A. Goss | Associate Professor at School of Engineering, London South Bank University, London, UK
  • E.L. Starostin | Research Fellow at School of Engineering, London South Bank University, London, UK
  • R.A. Grant | Senior Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK
Views 1309
Reading time 4 min
published on Jul 13, 2020