/
partner with:

Evolution & Behaviour

showing 6-10 of 63 breaks

A timeline for the Denisovans, an enigmatic group of archaic humans

One of the most intriguing revelations in human evolution of the past decade was the announcement in 2010 of the genome of a completely unknown archaic human (hominin), obtained from a girl's fingerbone found buried in Denisova Cave - a three-chambered cavern nestled in the... click to read more

  • Zenobia Jacobs | Professor at Centre for Archaeological Science, School of Earth, Atmospheric and Life Sciences and Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage, University of Wollongong, Australia
  • Richard "Bert" Roberts | Professor at Centre for Archaeological Science, School of Earth, Atmospheric and Life Sciences and Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage, University of Wollongong, Australia
Views 523
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jul 10, 2019
Overturning the hypothesis for how humans evolved language

Few traits are as uniquely human as complex spoken language. Language, therefore, has interested evolutionary biologists and neuroscientists seeking to understand what makes us, and in particular our brains, distinct from other animals. The first major genetic break in deciphering the underlying biological architecture of... click to read more

  • Elizabeth Atkinson | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital and Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, USA
Views 384
Reading time 4 min
published on Jul 8, 2019
Women’s birth canals are extremely variable in shape

If you open a book on human anatomy or human evolution, you will read that women have a hard time giving birth. This happens because the pelvis, the basin-like bone structure that supports our internal organs and connects to the spine and the legs, has... click to read more

  • Lia Betti | Senior Lecturer at Centre for Research in Evolutionary, Social and Inter-Disciplinary Anthropology, Department of Life Sciences, University of Roehampton, London, UK
  • Andrea Manica | Professor at Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, David Attenborough Building, The Old Schools, Trinity Ln, Cambridge CB2 1TN, UK
Views 435
Reading time 4 min
published on Jun 28, 2019
An ancient affair: a Neandertal woman and a Denisovan man had a daughter

In prehistoric times, at least two groups of hominins (that is, the entity which includes humans and their closest relatives) inhabited Eurasia: Neandertals, who lived throughout Europe and the Near East, and Denisovans, who likely lived in Asia. Genetically, Neandertals and Denisovans were more different... click to read more

  • Viviane Slon | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
Views 524
Reading time 4 min
published on Jun 19, 2019
Early humans inhabited North Africa earlier than thought

East Africa is notably known for yielding the earliest Oldowan stone tools and hominin butchered animal bones. They were excavated at the site of Gona in the Afar (Ethiopia) dated to 2.6 million years ago (Ma). Hence, most paleoanthropologists believed that human ancestors and their... click to read more

  • Mohamed Sahnouni | Professor at National Center for Research on Human Evolution (CENIEH), Burgos, Spain
Views 2087
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 22, 2019