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Earth & Space

showing 11-15 of 145 breaks

How life on Earth almost ended once

Life on Earth has never been so close to an end as during the environmental catastrophe that marked the Permian-Triassic boundary - 252 million years ago. Scientists have long speculated what could have triggered the sudden disappearance of so many organism groups - more than... click to read more

  • Hana Jurikova | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, UK
Views 971
Reading time 4 min
published on Jun 21, 2021
A surprisingly geologically active Venus – evidence for recent volcanic and tectonic activity

Our neighboring planet Venus is often called Earth's "twin" due to similarities in size, mass, and chemical makeup, but it's also considered to be an unusual planet that scientists are still trying to understand. Whereas Earth's environment can host life, that of Venus is typically... click to read more

  • Anna J. P. Gülcher | PhD Student at Department of Earth Sciences, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
Views 778
Reading time 4.5 min
published on Jun 17, 2021
Is the Sun a Sun-like star?

Is the Sun a Sun-like star? Asking this oxymoronic question might sound strange to most people, but not to astronomers. Comparing the Sun with other stars is a common technique to better understand the Sun and its behavior. Of particular interest here are stars very... click to read more

  • Timo Reinhold | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen, Germany
  • Alexander I. Shapiro | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen, Germany
Views 469
Reading time 4.5 min
published on Jun 11, 2021
Responding to sea-level rise: the importance of culture

In the 21st Century, sea-level rise is one of the most pressing concerns for coastal communities worldwide. However, this is not the first time that humans have been forced to respond to rising sea levels. Sea‑level rise shapes coastlines, causes more frequent flooding events and... click to read more

  • Robert L. Barnett | Lecturer at University of Exeter, Devon, South West England, UK
  • Sophie L. Ward | Research Fellow at Bangor University, Bangor, Wales, UK
Views 834
Reading time 4 min
published on Jun 10, 2021
Message in a frozen bubble: Antarctic ice reveals abrupt rises in atmospheric CO2 in the ancient past

Today's atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are higher than ever during at least the last 800'000 years. More importantly, the atmospheric levels of this greenhouse gas continue rising at a speed that is unparalleled in our planet's recent geological history. Intensifying extreme weather events and... click to read more

  • Christoph Nehrbass-Ahles | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
Views 673
Reading time 4.5 min
published on Jun 9, 2021