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Earth & Space

showing 11-15 of 122 breaks

Is dark matter lighting up the sky with X-rays?

Eighty-five percent of the mass in our Universe is the mysterious substance named dark matter. Besides giving it a name, however, we know little else about it. How can we claim we know dark matter exists if we can't even see it? Through gravity. Just... click to read more

  • Nick Rodd | Miller Fellow at University of California, Berkeley, USA
Views 366
Reading time 4 min
published on Mar 2, 2021
Too hot to stay cool: dangerously accelerating glaciers’ melt in New Zealand

Glaciers, popularly thought of as rivers of ice, are "sentinels" of climate change — stable and persisting over centuries, they slowly respond to environmental changes. So, measuring fluctuations in glaciers provides a great way to estimate the long-term effect of changing climate. Diminishing or even... click to read more

  • Jonathan L. Carrivick | Lecturer at School of Geography and water@leeds, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
  • Jenna L. Sutherland | Lecturer at School of Built Environment, Engineering and Computing, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK
Views 444
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Feb 24, 2021
Activating social tipping dynamics for a global decarbonization by 2050

Social sciences in the second part of the 20th century and early 21st century were predominantly occupied with gradual change processes. Most statistical models used to analyze socio-economic data assume change occurs gradually - in a linear manner. Recent months have demonstrated that we might... click to read more

  • Ilona M. Otto | Research Associate at Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany
Views 473
Reading time 3 min
published on Feb 23, 2021
Exposing the remnant core of a giant planet

What's out there? — We always have lots to learn from "others". The hunt for extrasolar planets (exoplanets) sets us to explore the diversity of the universe around us. An exoplanet is a planet orbiting around a star outside the Solar System. In the last few... click to read more

  • David Armstrong | Assistant Professor at Centre for Exoplanets and Habitability, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
Views 415
Reading time 4 min
published on Feb 22, 2021
Microplastics are raining down from the sky

It's entirely possible that tiny fragments of the windbreaker from your childhood, the straw you used sometime last year, or the label from a soft drink you had yesterday are now floating around in the atmosphere. The amount of plastic produced globally increases every year... click to read more

  • Janice Brahney | Assistant Professor at Utah State University, Logan, US
Views 806
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Feb 5, 2021