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Earth & Space

showing 16-20 of 122 breaks

What the “invisible” side of the Moon is like

Imagine what you see when looking up at the night sky — the Moon, the Earth's only satellite. Have you ever noticed that you actually always look at the same side of the Moon? Have you perhaps wondered what the other side is like? Scientists... click to read more

  • Yan Su | Professor at National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • Chunlai Li | Professor at National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • Elena Pettinelli | Professor at Mathematics and Physics Department, Roma Tre University, Roma, Italy
Views 474
Reading time 3 min
published on Feb 4, 2021
Microfibers in the ocean: are they all made of plastic?

Textile microfibers are fine strands of thread used to make clothing, carpeting and a myriad of very common household items like mops, table cloths and curtains. With use, these fibers are released and can now be found in the air we breathe, the water we... click to read more

  • Giuseppe Suaria | Research Scientist at CNR-ISMAR (Institute of Marine Sciences – National Research Council), Lerici, Italy
Views 603
Reading time 4 min
published on Feb 2, 2021
A neighborhood in space: finding the Moon’s age to understand Earth’s evolution

Understanding what made the Earth a habitable planet is an overarching goal of planetary sciences. Early events during the Earth's infancy set the initial conditions for its long-term evolution. The formation of its iron core and rocky mantle is one of those essential events. It... click to read more

  • Maxime Maurice | PhD student at German Aerospace Center (DLR), Rice University
Views 477
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Feb 1, 2021
How to stop a tragedy of the space commons

Satellites are an integral part of our lives. They guide us to our destinations; they connect people around the world; and they help us respond to natural disasters. Yet even as our reliance on orbital satellites grows, so too does the risk of ruining our... click to read more

  • Akhil Rao | Assistant Professor at Department of Economics, Middlebury College
Views 634
Reading time 4 min
published on Jan 29, 2021
What Caribbean coasts can tell us about the future of climate change

Today's climate change is driving geological changes such as coastal erosion and expansion of arid areas. It is also threatening our planet. Such dramatic climate changes happened before in the planet's history. These past events may teach us to forecast what the ongoing events are... click to read more

  • Lucas Vimpere | PhD student at University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 745
Reading time 3 min
published on Jan 28, 2021