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Sleepiness can disturb our social life

Imagine you would never again see your friends or family and how empty your life would be. It's obvious that social interactions benefit our mental health and wellbeing. This is also something that the Covid-19 pandemic has reminded us of, as we now have to... click to read more

  • Tina Sundelin | Senior Researcher at Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Benjamin C. Holding | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
  • John Axelsson | Professor at Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
Views 876
Reading time 3 min
published on Apr 28, 2021
Awake or dreaming: how brain ‘noise’ tells the difference

We spend almost one-third of our lives asleep, being disconnected from the world and seemingly 'inactive'. But sleeping is not a waste of time – it is essential for maintaining both our body and mind in good shape. Indeed, sleep is an exceptionally complex biological... click to read more

  • Janna D. Lendner | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, United States; Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
Views 898
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Mar 22, 2021
How the COVID-19 lockdown affected our sleeping patterns

Human biology and behavior change throughout the day. A primary internal timekeeper, located in the brain, and synchronized by light, controls these daily fluctuations. Social and cultural temporal cues are also able to set the time of our internal clock. Humans are a diurnal species:... click to read more

  • María Juliana Leone | Professor at Universidad Nacional de Quilmes – Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Views 1464
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Nov 3, 2020
Stop all the clocks: the hidden long-term consequences of sleep loss

The function of sleep is still elusive despite the well-known effects of sleep loss or poor-quality sleep on cognitive function and long-term health. When and how long animals (including humans) sleep is determined by, on the one hand, their internal circadian clock, which aligns physiology... click to read more

  • Charlotte N. Hor | Postdoctoral Researc Fellow at Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Paul Franken | Professor at Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
Views 1981
Reading time 4 min
published on Sep 22, 2020
Wake up microglia! How brain state regulates immune cells

Historically, neuroscience focused on neurons, the functional cellular units of communication in the brain. However, exciting recent advances in microscopy have revealed the importance of many other cell types in essential brain functions. Amongst these supporting players in the brain are microglia, the immune cells... click to read more

  • Rianne Stowell | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at University of Rochester Medical Center, New York, USA
Views 2386
Reading time 3 min
published on Sep 9, 2020