/
partner with:

honey bees

number of breaks: 3

showing 1-3 of 3 breaks

Honeydew: the sweet that can become toxic

Recent studies have demonstrated that insect populations are in decline. These declines represent serious concern because of the valuable ecosystem services provided by beneficial insects, such as pollination, biological control, nutrient cycling, and providing food sources to higher trophic levels in the food web. One... click to read more

  • Miguel Calvo-Agudo | PhD student at Centro de Protección Vegetal y Biotecnología, Unidad Mixta Gestión Biotecnológica de Plagas, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias, Moncada, Spain
  • Alejandro Tena | Researcher at Centro de Protección Vegetal y Biotecnología, Unidad Mixta Gestión Biotecnológica de Plagas, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias, Moncada, Spain
Views 726
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jun 5, 2020
Viruses are spilling over from managed honey bees to wild bumble bees

If you are a concerned environmentalist, or even a food-lover (bees produce every three bites of food you eat), you might have considered becoming a beekeeper to help "save the bees". For most, "bees" conjure up an image of a striped yellow and black insect,... click to read more

  • Samantha A. Alger | Assistant Research Professor at Biology Department, University of Vermont, Marsh Life Sciences, Burlington, VT, USA
Views 1110
Reading time 4 min
published on Mar 13, 2020
The berries and the bees: wild bees do it better

Even though that there are more than 20,000 species of bees worldwide, the word "bee" often invokes images of a hive-dwelling, golden-liquid-generating insect. Although honey bees have been stealing the spotlight for quite some time, most bee species are wild, unmanaged, and do not produce... click to read more

  • Gail MacInnis | PhD student at Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Views 1016
Reading time 3 min
published on Aug 22, 2019