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number of breaks: 5

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Could our gut’s microbes be the guardians of our brain’s health?

In the same way as our genome contains the collection of all of our genes, we call microbiome the collection of microorganisms that have settled in our organism. Over the past decades, the gut microbiome, in particular, has been shown to affect our physical health:... click to read more

  • Margot Riggi | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Section of Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 215
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Oct 10, 2018
Absent microbial teachers and immunological hooliganism

The trillions of microbes that live in our gastrointestinal tract are known as the gut microbiome. It is an "acquired organ" of the body that is essential for the development of immune and metabolic systems and for nutrient digestion and absorption, among other things. As... click to read more

  • Jun Miyoshi | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery (KCBD), The University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
  • Eugene Chang | Professor at Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery (KCBD), The University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
Views 235
Reading time 4 min
published on Sep 26, 2018
Killing C. difficile with targeted strikes

Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that causes hundreds of thousands of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea cases every year, and these infections often prove fatal. Usually, C. difficile is unable to cause disease as the bacterium is kept in check by the friendly bacteria in the gut; the... click to read more

  • Joseph Kirk | Postdoctoral Research fellow at The Krebs Institute, MBB, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
Views 1017
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jul 24, 2018
Studies of the bugs within: telling sickness from cure

Each of us carries intestinal gardens, where microbes process food for our own consumption. We evolved to benefit from this, but as our guests are selfish single-cell creatures, tense diplomacy was always needed. Since these bacterial communities in our gut play surprisingly large roles in... click to read more

  • Sofia K. Forslund | Junior Group Leader at Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine & European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Berlin, Germany
  • Oluf Pedersen | Professor at Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
Views 901
Reading time 4 min
published on Mar 20, 2018
Human gut parasite has a sinister use for its stolen genes

It is well established knowledge that bacteria routinely exchange genes between unrelated species, creating an extensive network of information flow independent of sexual reproduction. By acquiring new genes, each being a blueprint for a single protein, the bacteria gain also the functions the proteins perform... click to read more

  • Lukáš Novák | PhD student at Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic
Views 923
Reading time 3 min
published on May 18, 2017