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cancer

number of breaks: 18

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Floppy proteins and the hidden sequences they use to communicate

When the first protein structure was solved in 1958, scientists knew they had broken into a new frontier of biology. They felt that a protein’s structure would reveal all the secrets of its function, and almost 70 years down the line, over 150,000 structures have... click to read more

  • Theresa Hwang | PhD Student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
  • Amy Keating | Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Views 927
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 11, 2022
Using ants to sniff out cancer?

According to the WHO, cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Efficient screening programs exist but detect only a select number of cancers and are invasive and expensive. What if a team of scientists told you they had found a new original method... click to read more

Views 782
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Sep 21, 2022
Age matters: how aging affects cancer

Aging is the main risk factor for cancer, with more than 60% of cancer diagnoses occurring in those aged 65 and above. Yet, the vast majority of cancer research that guides the discovery of novel therapeutic targets and clinical trials neglects to account for the... click to read more

  • Ana P. Gomes | Assistant Professor at Department of Molecular Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA
Views 2068
Reading time 3 min
published on Aug 19, 2021
Gut microbes govern cancer

Our body is made of trillions of cells. Each of these tiny building blocks has its defined role, and together they create organs. While different cells in our body may look different in size and shape, they all share one common thing – DNA. DNA... click to read more

  • Eliran Kadosh | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Lautenberg Center for Immunology and Cancer Research, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Yinon Ben-Neriah | Professor at Lautenberg Center for Immunology and Cancer Research, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
Views 2220
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jul 29, 2021
The clock as a frenemy: the importance of the biological rhythms in cancer prognosis

Have you ever wondered why we wake up in the morning? Or why we get hungry at noon? Most physiological processes oscillate with a period close to 24 hours, called circadian rhythms. These rhythms are controlled by a central clock in our brain, which acts... click to read more

  • Ignacio Aiello | Assistant Professor at Laboratorio de Cronobiología, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Natalia Paladino | Assistant Professor at Laboratorio de Cronobiología, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Views 1856
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jun 1, 2021