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Content: Volume 7, Issue 4

showing 1-5 of 19 breaks

Math reveals the evolution of composition in paintings

A long-standing question in art and aesthetics is if there are culturally and temporally transcendent design principles within art and, if so, how the principles evolve over time. Among various design principles, compositional techniques in painting that focus on the spatial arrangement of elements on... click to read more

  • Byunghwee Lee | PhD Student at Department of physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Republic of Korea
  • Hawoong Jeong | Professor at Department of physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Republic of Korea
Views 2115
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Dec 29, 2021
Deep brain-mediated effects of stress on sleep and immunity

The brain is formed with a constellation of various types of neurons interacting with internal milieu and external surroundings in a dynamic manner. Sleep occupies one-third of one’s lifetime and a good night’s sleep is vital for survival. Living in a fast-paced modern society, people... click to read more

  • Shi-Bin Li | Research Scientist at Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, USA
  • Luis de Lecea | Professor at Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, USA
Views 2568
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Dec 27, 2021
Unveiling the secrets of ancient Egyptian ink

The earliest examples of preserving human thoughts by applying ink on a flexible and durable material, papyrus, were found in Ancient Egypt at the dawn of recorded history (c. 3200 BCE). Egyptians used black ink for writing body text, while red ink was often used... click to read more

  • Marine Cotte | Beamline scientist at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, and CNRS, Paris, France
  • Thomas Christiansen | Egyptologist at Egyptology Section, Department of Cross-Cultural and Regional Studies, University of Copenhagen (alumnus), Denmark
  • Sine Larsen | Professor at Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Views 3173
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Dec 22, 2021
How does the brain orchestrate survival?

We can think of the way the brain processes information as an orchestral ensemble. In the brain, information is mainly processed by a specialized type of brain cell called neurons, like individual instruments in the orchestra. Neurons use electrical signals to transmit information. These signals... click to read more

  • Shengjin Xu | Principal Investigator at Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China
  • Hui Yang | PhD graduate at Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, USA
  • Scott M. Sternson | Professor at Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, USA
Views 2638
Reading time 4 min
published on Dec 16, 2021
Snake uses its split jaws as a knife and fork

Many animals use their limbs to handle their food and obtain edible pieces from it. To take a relatable example, we humans peel fruits, fillet fish, and break crabs with our hands and tools. In contrast, most animals that lack limbs (like snakes) would be... click to read more

  • Yosuke Kojima | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Japan
Views 2601
Reading time 4 min
published on Dec 10, 2021