/
partner with:

Content: Volume 7, Issue 4

showing 11-14 of 14 breaks

Diversity matters – Syphilis and related diseases in historical Europe

First historical cases of sexually transmitted syphilis were documented by Italian doctors in the wake of Neapolitan war. The disease was characterized by painful pustules, frightful facial deformities, eventual madness and even death. The bacteria responsible for this scourge, Treponema pallidum (also known as T.... click to read more

  • Verena J. Schuenemann | Assistant Professor at Institute for Evolutionary Medicine, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • Kerttu Majander | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Institute of Evolutionary Medicine, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Views 572
Reading time 3 min
published on Oct 12, 2021
How roots help us fight against hard soils

Soil is a vital commodity for food security - more than 95% of global food production depends on soil. Modern intensive farming practices help us to meet the growing demand for food today. On the downside, they often compromise the health of agricultural soils. Increasingly heavy... click to read more

  • Bipin K. Pandey | BBSRC Discovery Fellow at Future Food Beacon and School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
  • Malcolm J. Bennett | Professor at Future Food Beacon and School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, UK
Views 1473
Reading time 3 min
published on Oct 8, 2021
Apes and monkeys understand syntax-like structures

Across the globe, humanity flourishes by sharing thoughts, culture, information, and technology through language – an incredibly complex method of communication used by no other species. Therefore, finding out why and when language evolved is crucial to understanding what it means to be human. However,... click to read more

  • Stuart K. Watson | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
Views 755
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Oct 6, 2021
Equalizing strength among sexes: generalized intersexuality in female moles

Female moles develop as intersexual individuals, a rather exceptional feature among mammals. But why did evolution shape the female mole body into an intersex one? Most likely, this is related to the rough environmental conditions where moles live. Moles spend their entire lives digging tunnels, fighting... click to read more

  • Francisca M. Real | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at RG Development & Disease, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics; Institute for Medical and Human Genetics, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Stefan Mundlos | Professor at RG Development & Disease, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics; Institute for Medical and Human Genetics, Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies (BCRT), Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Darío G. Lupiáñez | Research Group Leader at Max‐Delbrück‐Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC), Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology (BIMSB), Berlin, Germany
Views 719
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Oct 4, 2021