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Content: Volume 6, Issue 4

showing 11-15 of 48 breaks

Rising Water and Sinking Land: The Ganges Delta

The Ganges delta is the largest and most fertile river delta in the world, and home for nearly 200 million people. The low-lying delta plain, covering two-thirds of Bangladesh, stands less than one meter above sea level. The rising water-level in the delta is causing... click to read more

  • Mélanie Becker | Senior Scientist at Littoral Environnement et Sociétés, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique–Université de La Rochelle, France
  • Mikhail Karpytchev | Senior Lecturer at Littoral Environnement et Sociétés, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique–Université de La Rochelle, France
Views 3755
Reading time 2.5 min
published on Dec 9, 2020
A contributing gene for cannabis dependence

It's easy to see how certain traits can be linked back to your genetics, such as your hair color or height. It's also undeniable that some mental health disorders, such as schizophrenia, have a strong genetic link. More recently, substance use disorder - a category... click to read more

  • Caitlin E. Burgdorf | PhD graduate at Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10065, USA
  • Anjali M. Rajadhyaksha | Professor, Associate Dean of Program Development at Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10065, USA
  • Francis S. Lee | Chair and Psychiatrist-in-Chief Mortimer D. Sackler, M.D. Professor at Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10065, USA
Views 3118
Reading time 3 min
published on Dec 8, 2020
A quantum step forward in high pressure science

Under normal conditions, some materials are naturally better at conducting electricity than others. By applying high enough pressure, some materials that normally block the flow of electricity, like sulfur, can become conductors better than copper or gold. A wire of such "superconductor" could theoretically deliver... click to read more

  • Prabudhya Bhattacharyya | Graduate Student at Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
  • Thomas Mittiga | Graduate Student at Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.
Views 2416
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Dec 7, 2020
Hot currents: Global ocean circulation speeds up

The Earth has experienced rapid warming in recent decades. This warming is caused by increased emissions of greenhouse gases related to human activities, as found by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The ocean is an important player in this process, as it is... click to read more

  • Shijian Hu | Professor at Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Wenju Cai | Director, Professor at Centre for Southern Hemisphere Oceans Research, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisati
Views 2484
Reading time 2.5 min
published on Dec 4, 2020
Corals display bright colours to fight bleaching

A seemingly endless sea of ghostly white corals more and more often replaces a once-thriving reef. The image of mass coral bleaching is a striking portrait of how climate change is threatening marine ecosystems' survival and the millions of people they support. Coral bleaching occurs... click to read more

  • Elena Bollati | Research Fellow at Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117558, Singapore
  • Cecilia D’Angelo | Lecturer at Coral Reef Laboratory, University of Southampton, Waterfront Campus, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK
  • Jörg Wiedenmann | Professor at Coral Reef Laboratory, University of Southampton, Waterfront Campus, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK
Views 3071
Reading time 4 min
published on Dec 3, 2020