/
partner with:

Content: Volume 4, Issue 2

showing 6-10 of 19 breaks

How babies learn what we want

When someone reaches on tiptoes for the cookie jar, ignoring the baby carrots on her plate, we see more than a literal act of reaching: We understand the beliefs, desires, and motivations that lead to the action in the first place. Research from developmental psychology... click to read more

  • Shari Liu | PhD student at Lab For Developmental Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA
Views 5875
Reading time 3 min
published on Jun 12, 2018
Evolution does not care

Cells form the biological unit of all living organisms. But, like organisms, cells go through a life cycle: new cells emerge after cell division, they live, they age and they die. In some cases cell death is necessary for the organism's development and life. However,... click to read more

  • Thomas Wilhelm | PhD student at Institute of Molecular Biology, Ackermannweg 4 55128 Mainz, Germany
  • Holger Richly | Professor at Institute of Molecular Biology, Ackermannweg 4 55128 Mainz, Germany
Views 6124
Reading time 4 min
published on Jun 7, 2018
Microscopic Body-Snatchers Infest Our Oceans

Recently we have found that our oceans are full of microscopic "body-snatchers" that are important members of the ocean's food-web. The base of marine ecology rests upon the microscopic plankton. The origin of the term plankton is from the Greek word πλαγκτός meaning "I drift (myself)".... click to read more

  • Aditee Mitra | Senior Lecturer at Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, Wales, UK
Views 5593
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jun 5, 2018
An exoplanet with glowing water reveals its nature

Space-based observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope are providing valuable insights into the atmospheres of planets outside our solar system, known as "exoplanets". We have recently used Hubble to uncover the most compelling evidence to date for a stratosphere layer on one such exoplanet,... click to read more

  • Tom Evans | Research Fellow at College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom
Views 5554
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 24, 2018
Algae Living in Salamanders, Friend or foe?

Roughly speaking, our bodies use energy from the sun, but we can't use sunlight directly. Instead, plants and algae collect sunlight and store it as chemical energy through the process of photosynthesis. We can access that fuel directly when we eat plants, or indirectly when... click to read more

  • John Burns | Research Scientist at American Museum of Natural History, Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics and Division of Invertebrate Zoology, New York, United States
  • Ryan R. Kerney | Professor at Gettysburg College, Department of Biology, Gettysburg, United States
Views 7250
Reading time 4 min
published on May 22, 2018