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Psychology

showing 11-15 of 37 breaks

The "reasonable irrationality" principle

So, what decisions are considered sound? Foundational theories in neo-classic economics address this question by pointing to the concept of rationality. A rational person is aiming to maximize their preferences, to de facto pursue their self-interests. According to economists, a rational person uses abstract rules,... click to read more

  • Igor Grossmann | Professor at Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada
Views 2317
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Aug 26, 2020
When the girdle of social timing relaxes: Effects of the COVID-19 lockdown on human sleep

Do you know these Monday mornings when the alarm clock shakes you out of sleep way too early, and you already yearn for the next weekend, when you can finally lie in again? Actually, this illustrates a common situation in modern societies, where internally or... click to read more

  • Christine Blume | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel; Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
  • Marlene H. Schmidt | Graduate student at Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel; Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
Views 3365
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jul 9, 2020
Are students learning as much as they think they are? The dangers of fluent lectures

Think back to a college or high school classroom in a STEM subject (Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math). Your teacher probably talked most of the time, perhaps using the blackboard, a projector, or demonstrations to illustrate specific points. You mostly took notes and occasionally asked... click to read more

  • Louis Deslauriers | Senior Preceptor at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
  • Logan S. McCarty | Lecturer at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
Views 2576
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jun 22, 2020
How scientists communicate

In this project, we found that authors of psychology journal articles tended to make broad generalizations when describing their research findings. Examples include: "Whites and Blacks disagree about how well Whites understand racial experiences," "Animal, but not human, faces engage the distributed face network in... click to read more

  • Jasmine M. DeJesus | Assistant Professor at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA
  • Maureen A. Callanan | Professor at University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California, USA
  • Susan A. Gelman | Professor at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Views 2024
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jun 16, 2020
Infants expect leaders to right wrongs

Imagine you observe a conflict between two co-workers, fellow team players, or cousins. Would you be puzzled if their boss, coach, or grandparent (respectively), who witnessed this conflict, did nothing about it? Most of us would answer 'yes' because (1) we identify such figures with... click to read more

  • Maayan Stavans | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Cognitive Development Center, Department of Cognitive Science, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary
Views 2662
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Mar 18, 2020