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Neandertals

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Tracing the Ancestral Roots of Neandertals

Before modern humans started migrating outside Africa, Eurasia was home to Neandertals, a group of humans that parted ways with the ancestors of modern humans half a million years ago. Neandertals lived in Europe for hundreds of thousands of years, from at least 430,000 years... click to read more

  • Stéphane Peyrégne | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany
Views 647
Reading time 3 min
published on Feb 5, 2020
When were Denisovans and Neanderthals present in Eurasia?

Denisova Cave is an archaeological site in southern Siberia. Russian archaeologists have excavated it for over 30 years. It is the only site in the world we know to have been occupied by three different kinds of humans: Denisovans, Neanderthals, and us. Denisova came to... click to read more

  • Tom Higham | Professor at Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, Research Lab for Archaeology and the History of Art, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
Views 903
Reading time 4 min
published on Nov 13, 2019
An ancient affair: a Neandertal woman and a Denisovan man had a daughter

In prehistoric times, at least two groups of hominins (that is, the entity which includes humans and their closest relatives) inhabited Eurasia: Neandertals, who lived throughout Europe and the Near East, and Denisovans, who likely lived in Asia. Genetically, Neandertals and Denisovans were more different... click to read more

  • Viviane Slon | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
Views 1202
Reading time 4 min
published on Jun 19, 2019
The daily life of Neandertals

Neandertals are our closest evolutionary relative. They have been extinct for approximately 40,000 years, but lived across Europe and West Asia where they co-existed and interbred with humans. Despite their remarkable physical and genetic similarity to us humans, our understanding of their lifestyle is limited.... click to read more

  • Andrew Farrer | PhD student at Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD), School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5005 Australia
Views 2526
Reading time 4 min
published on Sep 19, 2017