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Content: Volume 8, Issue 4

showing 1-4 of 4 breaks

Mitochondria as microlenses in the eye – the evolution of an improved camera sensor

The back of the eye is lined with a layer of specialized light-sensitive neurons in the retina, arranged in a mosaic, called photoreceptors. Each photoreceptor has a tapered elongated shape—like a bottle—oriented perpendicular to the retina and pointing toward the pupil of the eye. The... click to read more

  • John M. Ball | Staff Scientist at Retinal Neurophysiology Section, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health
  • Wei Li | Senior Investigator at Retinal Neurophysiology Section, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health
Views 577
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 21, 2022
The flesh-eating Venus flytrap plant generates its own magnetic fields

In recent decades, more and more techniques from physics have been applied to biological systems, often with far-reaching consequences. For example, noninvasive techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are now commonly used to study or diagnose the human brain and body. The successful transfer of... click to read more

  • Anne Fabricant | PhD student at Helmholtz Institute Mainz, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany
  • Sönke Scherzer | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Molecular Plant Physiology and Biophysics, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
  • Dmitry Budker | Professor at Helmholtz Institute Mainz; Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany; University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA
Views 465
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 19, 2022
The Mystery of the Lizard Tail

When lizards are under attack, they break off their tails in a fraction of a second and escape. Scientifically, this is known as tail or caudal autotomy. Since the tail is an important organ of lizards for survival as it helps them nourish, run, leap,... click to read more

  • Navajit S. Baban | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Division of Engineering, New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
  • Yong-Ak Song | Associate Professor at New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; New York University, New York, USA
Views 491
Reading time 3 min
published on Oct 17, 2022
Floppy proteins and the hidden sequences they use to communicate

When the first protein structure was solved in 1958, scientists knew they had broken into a new frontier of biology. They felt that a protein’s structure would reveal all the secrets of its function, and almost 70 years down the line, over 150,000 structures have... click to read more

  • Theresa Hwang | PhD Student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
  • Amy Keating | Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Views 591
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 11, 2022