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Aleksa Djorovic

Senior Scientific Editor

About Aleksa

Aleksa has always been curious about how the world works, and this curiosity led him to a background both in Chemistry and Physics. Constantly balancing on the boundary between the two, he has seen that even similar scientific fields use starkly different language and thus the importance of correct and accurate communication for efficient science. Working towards a PhD in Biophotonics, understanding how light interacts with biological systems, he aims to inspire people about science and help bring science and society closer together with his love for the mysteries and wonders of nature.

Aleksa is the editor of 5 Breaks:

The Discovery Of An Unusual Repeating Radio Transient

We have discovered a new kind of repeating radio source using a sensitive low-frequency radio telescope in outback Western Australia. Its unusual properties indicate it could be a kind of never-before-detected object: an ultra-long-period magnetar.

Aug 22, 2022 | 3 min read
Magic Squares: A children’s puzzle meets quantum physics

A magic square is a grid of numbers where every column and row sum up to the same number. We explain the “quantum jump” for magic squares, generalizing them to the mathematical framework of quantum physics to interpret quantum measurement. We investigate the properties of these newly established quantum magic squares and find that the quantum world is even more magic than we thought before!

May 9, 2022 | 3.5 min read
E-skin: the future of sustainable & recyclable wearable electronics

An electronic “skin” can find applications in health care, robotics, and prosthetics, and can benefit the well-being, economy, and sustainability of our society. A sustainable futuristic electronic skin with superior stretching, self-healing, recycling, and reconfiguration capabilities has been developed by combining scientific advances in materials, electronics, mechanics and chemistry.

Apr 6, 2022 | 4 min read
Desertification danger: the aridification of humid regions

Several periods in the Earth's history were warmer than today and provide insight into future impacts of global warming. Climate and atmospheric changes can reactivate the continental dunes presently stabilised by vegetation. They are most likely to be reactivated in today's humid regions, threatening desertification within the densely-populated temperate zones of the northern hemisphere.

Mar 16, 2022 | 3 min read
Bee aware! Signs of a global decline in wild bee diversity

There is more to bees than honey: wild bees ensure efficient pollination of most flowering plants and food crops. Yet a recent study counting the number of species recorded worldwide every year suggests a bleak picture, finding a steep reduction in recent years. Although changes in how we record bees could overstate these results, such strong decline in bee diversity should trigger some alarms.

Oct 14, 2021 | 3.5 min read