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Dr. Quentin Laurent

Senior Scientific Editor

About Quentin

As a child, Quentin was already passionate for scientific matters. When he got older, his curiosity drove him towards organic chemistry studies in order to understand how the intertwining of small-scale events could regulate bigger ones. This naturally led him to a PhD in cellular uptake to decipher the related molecular mechanisms and find innovative ways to hijack them for future drug delivery. On top of his passion for doing science, Quentin enjoys sharing it with others and showing them the beauty of it through his “Science breaking” stories.

Quentin is the editor of 7 Breaks:

One Step Closer To Having Diabetes Under Control

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic illness that requires patients to control their blood sugar levels constantly. With daily injection of insulin to maintain healthy glucose concentrations, the patient’s quality of life suffers. A drug being tested on newly diagnosed patients could improve their quality of life by protecting and stimulating the pancreatic cells responsible for blood sugar regulation.

Aug 15, 2022 | 3.5 min read
Race And Gender Inequalities In Citations And Research Topics In US

The diversity of the US population is not well represented in its scientific workforce. In our research, we use large scale bibliometric databases to understand the relation between scientist identities, their research topics, and their impact. Our findings suggest that inclusion is key for a diversified research portfolio.

Aug 4, 2022 | 3.5 min read
Heart Disease And Brain Blood Flow Regulation: Prelude To Dementia

In a recent study, we investigated a crucial brain blood flow regulation mechanism in mouse models of heart disease and dementia. We found that there was a breakdown of this regulation in the brains of mice with heart disease. Furthermore, the combination of heart disease with Alzheimer’s led to the trebling of a key Alzheimer’s protein in the brain, which could eventually trigger dementia.

Jul 25, 2022 | 3.5 min read
Figuring out the evolved chemistry of fig trees

Fig trees (Ficus carica) produce furanocoumarins, a class of small organic molecules with various medicinal and agricultural applications. Villard et al. studied the enzyme catalysing the first synthetic step in the production of these molecules. They revealed how this enzyme emerged recently and independently within the Ficus lineage in a mechanism called convergent evolution.

May 20, 2022 | 3.5 min read
Notes from underground: naked mole-rats and vocal dialects

Cooperation relies on shared communication systems, such as language. We can now add one of the planet’s most cooperative rodents, the naked mole-rat, to the short list of species that use vocal dialects to help identify group members. Using a combination of computer algorithms and behavioral studies, we recently identified some of the special features of naked mole-rat communication.

Mar 1, 2022 | 3.5 min read
Brain activity of conservatives and liberals diverge while watching the news

Despite unprecedented access to multiple sources of information, polarization in political opinions is on the rise. Why does the same news footage trigger different responses in conservatives and in liberals? Analyzing the brain activity of partisans watching the news, we showed that the same information fosters different responses in their brain.

Jan 5, 2022 | 4 min read