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Earth & Space

showing 1-5 of 19 breaks

The Poisoned Oasis: Neonicotinoid Spillover Harms Bees Near Corn

Neonicotinoids are a highly controversial class of insecticides that are often applied as seed coatings for crops such as corn, soy and, canola. Neonicotinoids are systemic and water soluble; once treated-seeds are planted, the insecticides are taken up by the growing plant through the roots... click to read more

  • Nadia Tsvetkov | PhD student at Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, Canada
  • Amro Zayed | Associate Professor at Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, Canada
Views 429
Reading time 4 min
published on Jul 5, 2018
The breathing and fate of a rock slope

In mountainous regions, large sections of rocks slopes can be unstable and potentially collapse leading to catastrophic events where people and infrastructure are exposed. In most cases, movements affect the slope prior to the failure and can thus be measured to assess the hazard and... click to read more

  • Line Rouyet | PhD student at Norut – Northern Research Institute, Tromsø, Norway - Institute of Earth Sciences, Risk Analysis Group, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Views 204
Reading time 3 min
published on Jun 26, 2018
Big changes ahead for Antarctica’s plants and animals

Antarctic species don't just include the charismatic marine animals, such as killer whales, penguins and seals. There is actually a whole range of purely land-based animals and plants that spend their whole life-cycle on the frozen continent. These include moss and lichen, microbes and many... click to read more

  • Jasmine Lee | PhD student at Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science, The University of Queensland, Australia
Views 251
Reading time 3 min
published on Jun 21, 2018
Microscopic Body-Snatchers Infest Our Oceans

Recently we have found that our oceans are full of microscopic "body-snatchers" that are important members of the ocean's food-web. The base of marine ecology rests upon the microscopic plankton. The origin of the term plankton is from the Greek word πλαγκτός meaning "I drift (myself)".... click to read more

  • Aditee Mitra | Senior Lecturer at Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, Wales, UK
Views 251
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jun 5, 2018
An exoplanet with glowing water reveals its nature

Space-based observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope are providing valuable insights into the atmospheres of planets outside our solar system, known as "exoplanets". We have recently used Hubble to uncover the most compelling evidence to date for a stratosphere layer on one such exoplanet,... click to read more

  • Tom Evans | Research Fellow at College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom
Views 284
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 24, 2018