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Content: Volume 3, Issue 3

showing 1-5 of 12 breaks

Howler monkeys: living a life in colour helps finding better food

In terms of their ability to see colours, primates are unique compared to other mammals. Many primates have trichromatic colour vision and can see differences among red, orange, yellow, and green hues. What is particularly fascinating, however, is how much variation there is among primates... click to read more

  • Amanda D. Melin | Professor at Department of Anthropology and Archaeology & Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute University of Calgary, AB, Canada
Views 599
Reading time 4 min
published on Jul 3, 2017
Driving down malaria

Mosquitoes are the deadliest animals on earth, having killed more people than wars and plagues combined. This is because they spread debilitating diseases like malaria - which affects more than 200 million people each year. Despite a momentous effort to combat the disease over the... click to read more

  • Andrew Hammond | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Imperial College London, UK
  • Xenia Karlsson | M.Sc. student at Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Imperial College London, UK
  • Ziyin Wang | M.Sc. student at Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Imperial College London, UK
Views 1457
Reading time 4 min
published on Jul 18, 2017
Hips don’t lie: attraction revealed by dancing body language

Dancing forms a huge part of human social life, and humans often get together to dance when romance is in the air but what makes a good dancer? Human courtship is complex, yet we currently know a lot about the physical factors involved in one person... click to read more

  • Nick Neave | Associate Professor and Lecturer at Department of Psychology, Northumbria University, Newcastle, UK
Views 913
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jul 27, 2017
Guiding plant growth electronically

In the not too distant future computers may be used to directly monitor and control the growth of plants. For a moment, consider the prevalence of sophisticated electronic medical technologies already in use today. Patients now regularly receive retinal and cochlear implants to restore vision... click to read more

  • David J. Poxson | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, 60174 Norrköping, Sweden
  • Daniel T. Simon | Associate Professor at Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, 60174 Norrköping, Sweden
Views 787
Reading time 4 min
published on Aug 9, 2017
The mutation that allowed our brain to grow

During human evolution, one of the most remarkable events was the expansion of the upper layer of the brain: the so-called neocortex. This event took place about 2 million years ago and allowed us to develop the cognitive abilities that characterize modern day humans. In... click to read more

  • Reinier Prosee | PhD student at Department of Molecular Biology, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 727
Reading time 4 min
published on Aug 24, 2017