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Content: Volume 3, Issue 3

showing 6-10 of 12 breaks

Food for thought: recipe for bigger brains

There are hundreds of species of primates spread all across the globe that vary greatly in both brain size and intelligence. At the extremes, the great apes (our closest living relatives) have brains that are slightly larger than those of newborn humans, while mouse lemurs... click to read more

  • Alexandra R DeCasien | PhD student at Department of Anthropology, New York University, New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology, New York, USA
Views 5076
Reading time 4 min
published on Sep 4, 2017
How environment shapes…your nose

An important function of the human nose is to warm and humidify the air that we breathe in. This is important so as to prevent the inner respiratory tract from drying up, which can lead to infections. Because the shape of the nose and the... click to read more

  • Arslan Zaidi | PhD student at Department of Anthropology, PennState College of the Liberal Arts, The Pennsylvania State University, USA
  • Mark Shriver | Professor at Department of Anthropology, PennState College of the Liberal Arts, The Pennsylvania State University, USA
Views 6262
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Aug 29, 2017
The mutation that allowed our brain to grow

During human evolution, one of the most remarkable events was the expansion of the upper layer of the brain: the so-called neocortex. This event took place about 2 million years ago and allowed us to develop the cognitive abilities that characterize modern day humans. In... click to read more

  • Reinier Prosee | PhD student at Department of Molecular Biology, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 6438
Reading time 4 min
published on Aug 24, 2017
Guiding plant growth electronically

In the not too distant future computers may be used to directly monitor and control the growth of plants. For a moment, consider the prevalence of sophisticated electronic medical technologies already in use today. Patients now regularly receive retinal and cochlear implants to restore vision... click to read more

  • David J. Poxson | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, 60174 Norrköping, Sweden
  • Daniel T. Simon | Associate Professor at Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, 60174 Norrköping, Sweden
Views 5540
Reading time 4 min
published on Aug 9, 2017
Hips don’t lie: attraction revealed by dancing body language

Dancing forms a huge part of human social life, and humans often get together to dance when romance is in the air but what makes a good dancer? Human courtship is complex, yet we currently know a lot about the physical factors involved in one person... click to read more

  • Nick Neave | Associate Professor and Lecturer at Department of Psychology, Northumbria University, Newcastle, UK
Views 9656
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jul 27, 2017