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Content: Volume 7, Issue 1

showing 21-25 of 61 breaks

Is dark matter lighting up the sky with X-rays?

Eighty-five percent of the mass in our Universe is the mysterious substance named dark matter. Besides giving it a name, however, we know little else about it. How can we claim we know dark matter exists if we can't even see it? Through gravity. Just... click to read more

  • Nick Rodd | Miller Fellow at University of California, Berkeley, USA
Views 378
Reading time 4 min
published on Mar 2, 2021
Our blood may be making us smarter

There is nothing subtle about the immune system. T cells, potent immune cells found in the blood, can kill just about anything. In response to a viral infection, T cells move in, kill any of your cells that have a virus inside them, coordinate a... click to read more

Views 895
Reading time 4 min
published on Mar 1, 2021
Tuberculosis drug discovery: an in-house toxin blocks pathogenic bacterial growth

Infectious diseases rank among the greatest threats to human health. While the world stumbles through the current COVID-19 pandemic, a vast array of viral, fungal, parasitic, and bacterial pathogens continue to threaten people's lives. Before the rise of the pandemic, tuberculosis was the world's deadliest... click to read more

  • Yiming Cai | PhD Student at Laboratoire de Microbiologie et Génétique Moléculaires (LMGM), CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France
  • Ben Usher | PhD Student at Department of Biosciences, Durham University, Durham, UK
Views 963
Reading time 3 min
published on Feb 26, 2021
Saving the cadmium yellow pigments in The Scream

The Scream, realized by Edvard Munch between 1893 and 1916, is one of the most famous series of artworks of the modern era, symbolizing anxiety and anguish. There are a number of versions of The Scream: two paintings, two pastels, several lithographic prints and a... click to read more

Views 584
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Feb 25, 2021
Too hot to stay cool: dangerously accelerating glaciers’ melt in New Zealand

Glaciers, popularly thought of as rivers of ice, are "sentinels" of climate change — stable and persisting over centuries, they slowly respond to environmental changes. So, measuring fluctuations in glaciers provides a great way to estimate the long-term effect of changing climate. Diminishing or even... click to read more

  • Jonathan L. Carrivick | Lecturer at School of Geography and water@leeds, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
  • Jenna L. Sutherland | Lecturer at School of Built Environment, Engineering and Computing, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK
Views 455
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Feb 24, 2021