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Content: Volume 5, Issue 4

showing 1-5 of 21 breaks

Ancient human DNA from a 10000 years old "chewing gum"

In recent decades ancient DNA has been continuously used as a part of the tool-kit for studying human history and evolution. Ancient human DNA is found in both organic and inorganic material, for example, bones, teeth, mummified materials, coprolites, soil, etc. Bones and teeth harbor the... click to read more

  • Natalija Kashuba | PhD student at Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology, Uppsala University, Sweden
Views 131
Reading time 3 min
published on Dec 3, 2019
Gone but not forgotten – plant extinction in modern times

What do you think of when you hear the word 'extinction'? Chances are you think of dinosaurs or dodos. You'd be hard-pressed to find someone who thinks of plants. This contrast reflects that, until recently, we lacked a global overview of ongoing plant extinction. Extinction occurs... click to read more

  • A.M. Humphreys | Assistant Professor at Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
  • R. Govaerts | Senior Content Editor at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK
  • E. Nic Lughadha | Senior Research Leader at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK
  • M.S. Vorontsova | Research Leader at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK
Views 293
Reading time 4 min
published on Nov 29, 2019
High in the Pamir Mountains: Ancient Cannabis Smoking in Western China

Cannabis is one of the most contentious and widely used drug plants in the world today. However, its history of use and the role that it played among peoples in the past is poorly understood. Historians and archaeologists have debated about ancient drug use for... click to read more

  • Robert N. Spengler III | Laboratory Director at Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Department of Archaeology, Jena, Germany
Views 444
Reading time 4 min
published on Nov 27, 2019
Silver-screen or starving? Predicting success in showbiz

In 1905 Albert Einstein had his "annus mirabilis", giving him an unassailable status as a genius in modern culture. Was this year a miraculous coincidence, or on the other hand could this have been predicted? Recent research suggests that perhaps unexpectedly, the answer is no.... click to read more

  • Oliver E. Williams | PhD student at School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK
  • Lucas Lacasa | Reader at School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK
Views 230
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Nov 25, 2019
Long-dead dinosaurs support new life

Modern scientific equipment has revolutionized the study of hidden life. Advances in genetic sequencing allow us to discover mysterious worlds of diverse microbes in Earth's harshest environments or within our bodies. Life also hides from us through time. Studying long-extinct creatures can be challenging. We must... click to read more

  • Evan T. Saitta | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Integrative Research Center, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, USA
Views 255
Reading time 3 min
published on Nov 20, 2019