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environment

number of breaks: 14

showing 11-14 of 14 breaks

Resetting nature’s clock: shifting seasons and species relationships

Every year, many of us gaze in fascination at the movement of nature's clock, looking forward to seeing wild plants coming into bloom or the arrival of the first migrant birds. Less obvious, but just as dramatic, populations of phytoplankton bloom below the surface of... click to read more

  • Stephen Thackeray | Freshwater Ecologist at Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP, UK
  • Sarah Burthe | Animal Population Ecologist at Coastal Seas Ecology Group, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian, EH26 0QB, UK
Views 859
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Sep 14, 2016
Ocean acidification and its effects on coral reef growth

Aptly named "Rainforests of the Sea", tropical coral reefs are one of the most biodiverse ecosystems on the planet. Much like how trees of a forest provide shelter for plants and animals living within, corals reefs provide food and shelter for millions of species ranging... click to read more

  • Rebecca Albright | Postdoctoral Research Scientist at Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University, CA, USA
Views 952
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jul 8, 2016
Tara Oceans Expedition sequences the ocean

The Tara Oceans consortium recently published five scientific papers in the journal Science presenting the initial wave of scientific results from the first six years of the project.1-5 The findings show the extraordinary diversity of plankton in the world’s oceans, uncover many of the... click to read more

  • Chris Bowler | CNRS Director of Research at Ecole Normale Supérieure, PSL Research University, Institut de Biologie de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure (IBENS), Paris, France
Views 833
Reading time 4 min
published on Nov 24, 2015
Why some forests burn better than others

Forest fires are dramatic ecological events as they can wipe out most of the plants and animals within several kilometers in only a few hours and often also pose a major threat to human settlements. They have a positive ecological impact when occurring naturally because... click to read more

  • Elisa Dell'Aglio | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Botany and Plant Biology, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 911
Reading time 4 min
published on May 19, 2015