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environment

number of breaks: 14

showing 6-10 of 14 breaks

When and where neonicotinoids are bad for bees

The impact of neonicotinoids on bees has always been a contentious issue, not least because reported evidence of their effects has been variable. Neonicotinoids are most often applied to crop seeds, rather than sprayed directly on plants. As the plant grows the pesticide moves though... click to read more

  • Ben A. Woodcock | Ecological Entomologist at NERC, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK
  • Matthew S. Heard | Plant Ecologist at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK
  • Nadine Mitschunas | Field Ecologist at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
  • Brigitta Raffa | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Dora Vaskor | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Áron Bihlay | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Judy A. Webb | Associate Researcher at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
  • Richard F. Pywell | Biodiversity Science Area Head at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
Views 961
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 26, 2017
One root for every soil: a double-personality tale

In biology, life success is based on the ability to have offspring. For that, before reproduction, organisms must deal with different and sometimes unfriendly situations. The capacity to overcome environmental challenges increases the possibility to have descendants, and will determine then that organism's life success. A... click to read more

  • Laura Lorenzo | PhD student at Department of Plant Biology, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 860
Reading time 3 min
published on Sep 12, 2017
How environment shapes…your nose

An important function of the human nose is to warm and humidify the air that we breathe in. This is important so as to prevent the inner respiratory tract from drying up, which can lead to infections. Because the shape of the nose and the... click to read more

  • Arslan Zaidi | PhD student at Department of Anthropology, PennState College of the Liberal Arts, The Pennsylvania State University, USA
  • Mark Shriver | Professor at Department of Anthropology, PennState College of the Liberal Arts, The Pennsylvania State University, USA
Views 676
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Aug 29, 2017
The silent battle of young corals against ocean acidification

Coral reefs are ecosystems of extraordinary diversity. Considered "the rainforests of the sea", they contain ~35% of described marine species despite only occupying 0.2% of the world's ocean. Although they are extremely important habitat providers and form large living structures (some reefs can be seen... click to read more

  • Taryn Foster | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at School of Earth and Environment, The University of Western Australia, Australia
Views 797
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 19, 2016
Nitrogen pollution from lowlands reaches distant mountain lakes

Nitrogen is required by all living things, but too much of it can be a problem for aquatic ecosystems. Excess reactive nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium, forms that can be used directly by plants and algae) can cause lake eutrophication which can include harmful algal blooms,... click to read more

  • Beth Hundey | Adjunct Research Professor & eLearning specialist at Teaching Support Centre, Western University, London, Canada
  • Katrina Moser | Associate Professor at Department of Geography at Western University, London, Canada
  • Fred Longstaffe | Distinguished Professor at Department of Earth Science, Western University, London, Canada
Views 903
Reading time 3 min
published on Sep 21, 2016