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DNA

number of breaks: 9

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What happens to our genes in the twilight of death?

Death -- the ultimate end of everyone's journey. What is there to study? Is anything interesting happening? Aside from religious and philosophical discourses, valuable knowledge might be obtained from tangible physical facts. Consider an analogy: a disaster happens in a chemical plant that results in... click to read more

  • Peter Noble | Professor at Department of Periodontics, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
  • Alex Pozhitkov | Research Scientist at Department of Oral Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
Views 1087
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Feb 28, 2017
Amoebas trap bacteria using nets of DNA: the same mechanism as human immune cells

Our multicellular bodies containing trillions of cells seem to have little in common with protists, the tiny single-celled creatures inhabiting every drop of water, which spend their days eating bacteria or each other, parasitizing larger organisms or living from light. And yet, this is how... click to read more

  • Lukáš Novák | PhD student at Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic
Views 899
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jan 27, 2017
A new code for a new life

Life on our planet is based on DNA. DNA is a big molecule present in all organisms, and it contains the instructions to build each of life's components. It is the biological way to store and spread information. It is the universal language of life... click to read more

  • Jordan Costafrolaz | PhD student at Microbiology Unit, Department of Botany and Plant Biology, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 1036
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 26, 2016
GMOs are not a human invention: sweet potato is a naturally transgenic food crop

Sweet potato is one of the most important food crops for human consumption in the world. It is especially grown and consumed in Sub-Saharan Africa, parts of Asia, and the Pacific islands. Additionally, it is one of the earliest domesticated crops, documented by archeological findings... click to read more

  • Tina Kyndt | Research Professor at Department Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University (UGent), Ghent, Belgium
Views 1830
Reading time 3 min
published on Jul 6, 2015