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Content: Volume 3, Issue 4

showing 1-6 of 13 breaks

Global contamination of honey by insecticides

Bees and other pollinators provide indispensable ecosystem services and are essential for the cultivation of one third of crops worldwide. Yet, this free service may be threatened by the use of insecticides among which neonicotinoids. There is currently a strong debate about banning these pesticides.... click to read more

  • Edward A. D. Mitchell | Professor at Laboratory of Soil Biodiversity, University of Neuchâtel, Rue Emile-Argand 11, 2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
  • Blaise Mulhauser | Curator & Director at Botanical Garden of Neuchâtel, Pertuis-du-Sault 58, 2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
  • Matthieu Mulot | PhD student at Laboratory of Soil Biodiversity, University of Neuchâtel, Rue Emile-Argand 11, 2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
  • Aline Mutabazi | Research Assistant at School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva, Centre Médical Universitaire – Rue Michel Servet, 1, 1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland.
  • Gaétan Glauser | Senior Scientist at Neuchâtel Platform of Analytical Chemistry, University of Neuchâtel, Avenue de Bellevaux 51, 2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland.
  • Alexandre Aebi | Senior Lecturer at Laboratory of Soil Biodiversity, University of Neuchâtel, Rue Emile-Argand 11, 2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
Views 861
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Dec 18, 2017
Survival of the friendliest

More than forty million Americans cherish their tail-wagging, face-licking, ball-fetching best friends. But not many people would welcome a wolf into their home. What makes dogs so uniquely friendly? Scientists have studied the unique relationship between humans and domestic dogs for decades, but the role... click to read more

  • Monique Udell | Assistant Professor at Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences, Oregon State University, OR 97331, USA
  • Emily Shuldiner | Undergraduate student at Princeton University, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, 106A Guyot Hall, Princeton, USA
  • Bridgett vonHoldt | Assistant Professor at Princeton University, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, 106A Guyot Hall, Princeton, USA
Views 819
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Dec 13, 2017
Plants have deep roots in time

Plants capture sunlight to turn water and carbon dioxide into food and oxygen. This seemingly simple process is called photosynthesis. Without it we wouldn't be able to eat and breathe. What framed the benignant greenery, how did plants come to paint the Earth emerald and... click to read more

  • Stefan Bengtson | Professor emeritus at Department of Palaeobiology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007 SE-104 05, Stockholm, Sweden.
Views 976
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Dec 6, 2017
Bringing the flavor back to modern tomatoes

While many people remember the wonderful flavor of a garden-grown heirloom tomato, this flavor is not found in modern commercial tomatoes. Modern tomato breeding has focused on disease resistance, yield, shelf-life and firmness for shipping. While these traits are essential for large scale year-round production... click to read more

  • Denise Tieman | Research assistant at University of Florida, Horticultural Sciences Dept., Gainesville FL 32611
Views 902
Reading time 3 min
published on Dec 1, 2017
How do plants breathe?

Whether or not you like your sprouts, plants will likely form a major component of your diet: cereals, bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, chips, etc. all come from plants. Rice, maize and wheat alone make up 60% of the world's food intake. Not only are plants... click to read more

  • Richard Morris | Professor at John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UH, UK
  • Hugh Woolfenden | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UH, UK
Views 1033
Reading time 4 min
published on Nov 22, 2017
Boechera, Why are you so Cool?

Kipling once said: "Only mad-dogs and Englishmen go out in the noon day sun". To this list we can also add plants they are out in the noon day sun because they are not able to move to the shade when things get hot. Plants... click to read more

  • Elizabeth Waters | Professor at San Diego State University, Campanile Drive San Diego, CA, USA
Views 668
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Nov 21, 2017