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Content: Volume 3, Issue 4

showing 1-5 of 13 breaks

Red in Tooth and Claw: another weapon against antibiotic resistance

Bacteria are an integral part of human life. These organisms are on your skin, in your mouth, your ears, and your gut. After birth, a diverse population is acquired by the age of three and remarkably the population is quite similar and just as diverse... click to read more

  • Nicholas A. Isley | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at The Scripps Research Institute, BCC-483, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Rd. La Jolla, CA 92037
Views 1054
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Oct 3, 2017
By default, people treat immoral actions as impossible

Imagine that you're on the way to the airport to catch a flight, but your car breaks down on the side of the road. In this situation, some of the solutions you would immediately consider seem obvious: you might call a friend, hail a taxi,... click to read more

  • Jonathan Phillips | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
Views 1008
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 11, 2017
‘Laughing’ together: bridging avian-mammalian differences

We like animals that we perceive as being similar to ourselves. It is not a coincidence that those animals that humans consider similar to them in terms of appearance, intelligence and/or sociality, also enjoy the highest levels of protection in modern societies (for example primates,... click to read more

  • Raoul Schwing | Professor at Messerli Research Institute, Comparative Cognition, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna), Vienna, Austria
  • Amelia Wein | PhD student at Messerli Research Institute, Comparative Cognition, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna), Vienna, Austria
Views 807
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Oct 17, 2017
When and where neonicotinoids are bad for bees

The impact of neonicotinoids on bees has always been a contentious issue, not least because reported evidence of their effects has been variable. Neonicotinoids are most often applied to crop seeds, rather than sprayed directly on plants. As the plant grows the pesticide moves though... click to read more

  • Ben A. Woodcock | Ecological Entomologist at NERC, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK
  • Matthew S. Heard | Plant Ecologist at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK
  • Nadine Mitschunas | Field Ecologist at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
  • Brigitta Raffa | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Dora Vaskor | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Áron Bihlay | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Judy A. Webb | Associate Researcher at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
  • Richard F. Pywell | Biodiversity Science Area Head at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
Views 1062
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 26, 2017
The belligerence of breeding: female aggression after mating

Sex changes us. In addition to the overwhelming Puberty-Blues kind of way, sex induces physical changes that occur across the entire animal kingdom, from elephants to fruit flies. Yet, there's one glaring aspect of sex that few scientists have studied - female aggression. That's where... click to read more

  • Eleanor Bath | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Christ Church College, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD, UK.
Views 2756
Reading time 4 min
published on Nov 1, 2017