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Content: Volume 3, Issue 2

showing 1-5 of 8 breaks

“Who is really, really smart?” Early differences in boys’ and girls’ assumptions about intelligence

Common stereotypes associate brilliance with men more than women. Evidence for this association is everywhere around us, but maybe easiest to detect in portrayals of brilliance and genius on TV and in the movies. The vast majority of characters that are supposed to be brilliant,... click to read more

  • Lin Bian | PhD student at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA
Views 1534
Reading time 3 min
published on Apr 6, 2017
Hacking the tryptophan metabolic process to reduce neurodegeneration

Oats, dried prunes, tuna fish, milk, chicken, bread, peanuts, and chocolate are fabulous foods that enrich our everyday meals. But apart from their culinary properties, they are also great sources of tryptophan. Tryptophan is an amino acid which is used by cells either as a... click to read more

  • Carlo Breda | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
Views 932
Reading time 3 min
published on Apr 25, 2017
Symbiogenesis: how algae and bacteria shaped new genes together

Genes are an essential component of every living being. They are encoded in the DNA, and contain the information needed to produce a fully-functional organism. Deciphering the origin of new genes in organisms is important to understand how living beings adapted to their environment. Genes... click to read more

  • Raphaël Méheust | PhD student at Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6, Unité de recherche Systématique, Adaptation, Évolution
  • Eric Bapteste | Professor at Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6, Unité de recherche Systématique, Adaptation, Évolution
Views 856
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 3, 2017
The power of our adaptive immunity against Alzheimer’s Disease

One of the fears that arise with aging is being afflicted with dementia. Alzheimer’s disease (simply ”Alzheimer” from now onwards) is the most common type of dementia worldwide, representing up to 60% of total cases of dementia in western countries. Alzheimer is a serious world-health... click to read more

  • Daniele Guido | PhD student at Department of Cell Physiology and Metabolism, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 881
Reading time 3 min
published on May 10, 2017
Human gut parasite has a sinister use for its stolen genes

It is well established knowledge that bacteria routinely exchange genes between unrelated species, creating an extensive network of information flow independent of sexual reproduction. By acquiring new genes, each being a blueprint for a single protein, the bacteria gain also the functions the proteins perform... click to read more

  • Lukáš Novák | PhD student at Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic
Views 914
Reading time 3 min
published on May 18, 2017