/
partner with:

Evolution & Behaviour

showing 21-25 of 44 breaks

Following the traces of fermentation

Yeasts are everywhere. This little bubbly-like single-cell fungus is a superstar of human food culture. Bread, beer, yogurt, cheese, wine and even coffee and cacao require yeast for their preparation. Thanks to Louis Pasteur we know that yeasts are responsible for the process of fermentation... click to read more

  • Anatoly Kozlov | PhD student at Department of Genetics & Evolution, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 1114
Reading time 4 min
published on Jan 16, 2018
Moby, can you hear me whale?

Under the name "whale" lies an important diversity of aquatic mammals. Usually, scientists divide them into three groups. "Baleen whales", also called whales with mustache, is an extant group including the humpback whales and the largest animals that ever lived on earth, the blue whales.... click to read more

  • Mickaël Mourlam | PhD student at Département FORME, Institut des Sciences de l'Évolution, Université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France
Views 1224
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jan 11, 2018
Survival of the friendliest

More than forty million Americans cherish their tail-wagging, face-licking, ball-fetching best friends. But not many people would welcome a wolf into their home. What makes dogs so uniquely friendly? Scientists have studied the unique relationship between humans and domestic dogs for decades, but the role... click to read more

  • Bridgett vonHoldt | Assistant Professor at Princeton University, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, 106A Guyot Hall, Princeton, USA
  • Emily Shuldiner | Undergraduate student at Princeton University, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, 106A Guyot Hall, Princeton, USA
  • Monique Udell | Assistant Professor at Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences, Oregon State University, OR 97331, USA
Views 1348
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Dec 13, 2017
Plants have deep roots in time

Plants capture sunlight to turn water and carbon dioxide into food and oxygen. This seemingly simple process is called photosynthesis. Without it we wouldn't be able to eat and breathe. What framed the benignant greenery, how did plants come to paint the Earth emerald and... click to read more

  • Stefan Bengtson | Professor emeritus at Department of Palaeobiology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007 SE-104 05, Stockholm, Sweden.
Views 1336
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Dec 6, 2017
The belligerence of breeding: female aggression after mating

Sex changes us. In addition to the overwhelming Puberty-Blues kind of way, sex induces physical changes that occur across the entire animal kingdom, from elephants to fruit flies. Yet, there's one glaring aspect of sex that few scientists have studied - female aggression. That's where... click to read more

  • Eleanor Bath | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Christ Church College, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD, UK.
Views 2931
Reading time 4 min
published on Nov 1, 2017