/
partner with:

Earth & Space

showing 16-20 of 25 breaks

When and where neonicotinoids are bad for bees

The impact of neonicotinoids on bees has always been a contentious issue, not least because reported evidence of their effects has been variable. Neonicotinoids are most often applied to crop seeds, rather than sprayed directly on plants. As the plant grows the pesticide moves though... click to read more

  • Ben A. Woodcock | Ecological Entomologist at NERC, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK
  • Matthew S. Heard | Plant Ecologist at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK
  • Nadine Mitschunas | Field Ecologist at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
  • Brigitta Raffa | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Dora Vaskor | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Áron Bihlay | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Judy A. Webb | Associate Researcher at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
  • Richard F. Pywell | Biodiversity Science Area Head at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
Views 1062
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 26, 2017
The silent battle of young corals against ocean acidification

Coral reefs are ecosystems of extraordinary diversity. Considered "the rainforests of the sea", they contain ~35% of described marine species despite only occupying 0.2% of the world's ocean. Although they are extremely important habitat providers and form large living structures (some reefs can be seen... click to read more

  • Taryn Foster | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at School of Earth and Environment, The University of Western Australia, Australia
Views 884
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 19, 2016
Nitrogen pollution from lowlands reaches distant mountain lakes

Nitrogen is required by all living things, but too much of it can be a problem for aquatic ecosystems. Excess reactive nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium, forms that can be used directly by plants and algae) can cause lake eutrophication which can include harmful algal blooms,... click to read more

  • Beth Hundey | Adjunct Research Professor & eLearning specialist at Teaching Support Centre, Western University, London, Canada
  • Katrina Moser | Associate Professor at Department of Geography at Western University, London, Canada
  • Fred Longstaffe | Distinguished Professor at Department of Earth Science, Western University, London, Canada
Views 963
Reading time 3 min
published on Sep 21, 2016
Resetting nature’s clock: shifting seasons and species relationships

Every year, many of us gaze in fascination at the movement of nature's clock, looking forward to seeing wild plants coming into bloom or the arrival of the first migrant birds. Less obvious, but just as dramatic, populations of phytoplankton bloom below the surface of... click to read more

  • Stephen Thackeray | Freshwater Ecologist at Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP, UK
  • Sarah Burthe | Animal Population Ecologist at Coastal Seas Ecology Group, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian, EH26 0QB, UK
Views 860
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Sep 14, 2016
Ocean acidification and its effects on coral reef growth

Aptly named "Rainforests of the Sea", tropical coral reefs are one of the most biodiverse ecosystems on the planet. Much like how trees of a forest provide shelter for plants and animals living within, corals reefs provide food and shelter for millions of species ranging... click to read more

  • Rebecca Albright | Postdoctoral Research Scientist at Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University, CA, USA
Views 953
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jul 8, 2016